Injured Wildlife

As a volunteer powered charitable organization,

we do not have the means or resources for pick ups or field rescues.

We must rely on finders bringing animals in need of care to our facility.

Please do not bring animals to the centre without first confirming an intake time with a wildlife volunteer.

KWC is NOT authorized for Rabies Vector Species

For assistance with a Raccoon, Skunk, Fox or Bat, please contact the closest wildlife centre to you, authorized to accept RVS.

Common Wildlife Injuries

Window Strike


If a bird has -or you suspect it has- flown into a window, it may be suffering from a range of injuries from concussion or head trauma, to broken wings and bones or internal organ damage. Many birds do not survive the impact of a window strike. If the bird does survive the initial impact it may quickly be prayed upon by roaming cats or natural predators like foxes or hawks. Birds are extremely sensitive to inflammation resulting from physical trauma like that from widow strikes or vehicular collisions. Follow our Wildlife Capture Guide and contact us or the closest authorized wildlife custodian to you for next steps.




Road Strike


Hitting an animal with your vehicle or seeing one in distress on the road can be very upsetting. It’s important to remain calm, watch for oncoming traffic and assess the situation for your safety before proceeding to assist an animal in the road.

  • It it’s safe to do so, put on your hazard lights on and pull over.
  • For large game like Bear, Coyote or Deer call the police to report the collision and for assistance.
  • if you feel comfortable and equipped, follow Wildlife Capture Guide to contain the animal.
  • Contact us or an authorized wildlife custodian for further next steps
If the animal is dead, use gloves, a shovel or piece of cardboard to move it off from the road and prevent scavengers from getting hit while foraging on the remains. Contact the local municipality animal control for removal.




Cat / Dog Attack


Our domestic pets can have severe and detrimental effects on wild animals and birds they come into contact with while outside. We generally will recommend any wild animal that has been grabbed or pawed by a cat or dog be brought in for assessment and treatment. Though many times an animal may seem calm or uninjured after an altercation with a pet, they are likely suffering from internal injuries or broken bones not easily spotted by the untrained eye. Calmness is often miss understood by finders as a positive thing, but for wild animals its generally a sign of shock, pain or fear. If you have found a wild animal you know or suspect has been attacked by a cat or dog, follow the Wildlife Capture Guide and contact us or an authorized wildlife custodian near you.





Common Wildlife Illnesses

Mange


A common microscopic bug that burrows beneath the skin causing intense irritation and can often lead to serious infections. Healthy wild furbearing mammals often recover on their own from mild infections, but severe cases or in animals that are compromised the infection can lead to life threatening secondary infections or starvation. Severe cases will need treatment, which can be very effective. Follow the Wildlife Capture Guide or contact a wildlife custodian authorized for the species you are concerned about. The effects of rodenticides are still being studied but it is understood they weaken the immune system of animals consuming poison or poisoned prey, leaving them susceptible to complicated mange infections.




Pox: Squirrel / Avian


There are many different types and strains of the Pox Virus, some that exclusively effect either Squirrels or Birds. Sores, legions or abscesses, especially around the nose, eyes, feet and urogenital area, are often symptoms of various pox infections. Pox viruses are highly contagious and can be spread through direct contact with infected birds and animals or contaminated surfaces (e.g., feeders), or by ingestion of contaminated food or water. There is no genuine cure, and most birds and animals will succumb to the virus in time. If you have seen a wild animal or bird with what you think may be suffering from a pox infection, contact us or an authorized wildlife custodian near you. If there are bird or squirrel feeders up they should be taken down for at least two weeks to prevent further spread. Make sure to wash them before putting them back up, or consider a pollinator garden to support native birds without the risk of spreading disease.




House Finch Eye Disease


Mycoplasmal conjunctivitis is a bacterial disease that leaves birds with red, swollen, runny, or crusty eyes. In extreme cases the bird may go blind when the eyes become swollen shut. You might observe an infected bird sitting quietly in your yard, clumsily scratching an eye against its foot or a perch. While some infected birds recover, many die from starvation, exposure, or predation. The disease has affected several other wild bird species, including American Goldfinch, Evening Grosbeak, and Purple Finch. If the bird can be safely captured, treatment is often successful. If you have seen a wild bird suffering from you think may be Conjuctivitus, follow the Wildlife Capture Guide and contact us or an authorized wildlife custodian near you. If there are bird feeders up they should be taken down for at least two weeks to prevent further spread. Make sure to wash them before putting them back up, or consider a pollinator garden to support native birds without the risk of spreading disease.




Distemper


It can be very difficult to distinguish the symptoms of distemper from rabies, and both viruses effect similar species including raccoons, skunks and foxes. The virus causes respiratory congestion, visible by discharge around the nose and eyes. As the virus progresses it damages neurological tissue, often causing spinning, seizures and teeth chattering. Pets should be routinely vaccinated against distemper but there is a risk of transfer if your pets vaccines are out of date. Contact a wildlife custodian authorized for RVS before approaching an animal you suspect is suffering from distemper.




Rabies


Rabies is a zoonotic virus - meaning it can be transmitted from animals to humans. All mammals can contract rabies but in Ontario it is usually seen in raccoons, skunks, foxes and bats. Once symptoms present it is almost always fatal, often within just a few weeks. The virus is spread through saliva and can infect through a bite, scratch or mucous membranes like in the mouth or eyes. Contact a wildlife custodian authorized for RVS before approaching an animal you suspect may be suffering from rabies. For more information about rabies, provincial management programs, and what to do if you’ve been exposed, contact the MNRF or your local public health unit.





Turtles
For information about Ontario’s 8 native turtle species and how to help them, visit the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre.
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Racing Pigeons
Although Rock Pigeons are quite successful and prolific in many parts of North America, they are not a native species and are actually all descendants of domesticated racing or utility birds. Most Pigeons are ferrel with no owners, but if you have spotted a pigeon in distress with a band on its leg, you will need to contact the owner using the band number. Please visit the Canadian Racing Pigeon Union for more information.
Black Bears
Prevent and report encounters and learn who to contact.
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Canids
For information on Ontarios native canines (fox, coyote, wolf), the threats the face from increased urbanization, and support with cummunity coexitence, please visit Coyote Watch Canada.

Respect the cycle

Native wild species of predators and prey are integral parts of the food chain and we must never confuse compassion with interference. We must never attempt to interfere with the natural course of events or impede a hunt in the name of a rescue.

 

Get them help immediately

Time is critical with any injury or illness; delays in treatment can complicate injuries and lessen the likelihood of recovery. Bird bones start healing after just a few days, untreated pain and inflammation can lead to permanent damage. Wild animals are more robust than many domesticated species and can suffer with life threatening conditions for days or even weeks without assistance or intervention. Authorized Wildlife Custodians are equipped and skilled to help elevate and prevent prolonged suffering.

 

Find an Authorized Wildlife Custodian Near You

For species KWC is not authorized or equipped to accept (RVS), please contact the closest facility near you for guidance.

Help us help an animal in need.
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Registered Charity #703755694 RR0001